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During a 1962 stump speech at Yale, President Kennedy was heckled by a group of students. Clearly embarrassed by his peers, “Yaleie” (and current Secretary of State) John Kerry sent JFK this apology letter.

Read the letter her: bit.ly/1phiNRM

Read the 1962 Chicago Tribune article on the event here: http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1962/10/18/page/26/article/kennedy-gets-lusty-booing-in-new-haven/

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Now on display, an ancient Egyptian bracelet gifted to Jacqueline Kennedy from JFK for their 10th wedding anniversary. The couple were married on this day in 1953.

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A snapshot of a snapshot: a visitor takes a peek at “Superman’s Mission for President Kennedy.” #art #history #boston

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Our new favorite Tumblr, for obvious reasons. Watch out @mapoliwithanimals! We’ll be providing you with tons of content.

mapoliwithanimals:

President John F. Kennedy with a deer (courtesy JFK Library)

Source: mapoliwithanimals
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La Biblioteca Presidencial John F. Kennedy se ha unido a la Oficina de Comunicaciones de los Archivos Nacionales para extender su alcance de medios de comunicación social para el público de habla hispana. Tal parece que de casualidad, nuestra interna de la Biblioteca Kennedy, estaba en medio de la catalogación del viaje de 1962 del presidente y la señora Kennedy a México, cuando los Archivos Nacionales anunciaron a su nueva interna de Diversidad e Inclusion contratada para promover un proyecto piloto destinado a ampliar el alcance de los medios de comunicación social.

Tras haber catalogado más de 150 fotos del viaje a México, la interna de catalogación de las fotografías de la Casa Blanca de la Biblioteca Kennedy, Lillianne “Lilli” Germain, crea la siguiente “blog post” que ofrece materiales de los archivos relacionados con la visita. La Biblioteca Kennedy contó con la ayuda de la interna de Diversidad e Inclusión de los Archivos Nacionales, Idaliz “Ida” Marie Ortiz Morales, para traducir el blog de Lilli en español. Estamos muy contentos de compartir los resultados del trabajo duro de Lilli y de Ida!

Busque aquí para versiones en inglés y en español de un nuevo “blog post” sobre el viaje de JFK a México en 1962 aqui: http://archiveblog.jfklibrary.org/


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Ver esta foto y más imágenes de la carpeta aqui: http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKWHP-1962-06-30-F.aspx

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Ver esta foto y más imágenes de la carpeta aqui: http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKWHP-1962-06-29-C.aspx

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Ver esta foto y más imágenes de la carpeta aqui: http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKWHP-ST-C1-10-62.aspx

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Ver esta foto y más imágenes de la carpeta aqui: http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKWHP-1962-06-30-A.aspx

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The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library has teamed up with the National Archives Communications Office to extend its social media reach to Spanish-speaking audiences. As chance would have it, a Kennedy Library intern was in the midst of cataloging President and Mrs. Kennedy’s 1962 trip to Mexico when NARA announced a new Diversity and Inclusion intern hired to promote a pilot project aimed at expanding outreach.

After cataloging over 150 photos from the trip to Mexico, Kennedy Library White House Photographs cataloging intern, Lillianne “Lilli” Germain, created the following blog post featuring archival materials related to the visit; the Kennedy Library enlisted the help of NARA’s Diversity and Inclusion intern, Idaliz “Ida” Marie Ortiz Morales, to translate Lilli’s blog into Spanish. We are excited to share the results of Lilli and Ida’s hard work!

Check out English & Spanish versions of a new blog post about JFK’s trip to Mexico in 1962: http://archiveblog.jfklibrary.org/2014/08/we-come-as-good-neighbors-presidential-visit-to-mexico-june-29-july-1-1962/

Español: http://archiveblog.jfklibrary.org/2014/08/venimos-como-buenos-vecinos-la-visita-presidencial-a-mexico-junio-29-julio-1-de-1962/

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View this photo and more images from the folder here: http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKWHP-1962-06-29-C.aspx

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 View this photo and more images from the folder here: http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKWHP-1962-06-30-F.aspx

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View this photo and more images from the folder here: http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKWHP-ST-C1-10-62.aspx

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View this photo and more images from the folder here: http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKWHP-1962-06-30-A.aspx

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Eroni Kumana, one of two Solomon Islanders who saved the life of John F. Kennedy during World War II, died on Saturday at the age of 93.

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(Eroni Kumana in 2009. Robert Craigie/JFK Library)

On August 2, 1943, while on night patrol under 26-year-old Navy Lieutenant John F. Kennedy’s command, PT 109 was hit and sunk by a Japanese destroyer. Two crew members died instantly; eleven others eventually swam to a small island. Kennedy rescued a badly burned crew member by holding the man’s life jacket between his teeth and towing him to safety.

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(The crew of PT-109. John F. Kennedy is seen at far right. JFK Library)

Over the next three days, Kennedy and his surviving crew members drank the milk and ate the meat of coconuts while Kennedy swam for hours over sharp corals in shark-infested waters searching for friendly boats.

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(Lt. John F. Kennedy in the South Pacific, circa 1943/ John F. Kennedy Library Foundation)

On August 6th -71 years ago today- Lt. Kennedy encountered two native islanders, Eroni Kumana and Biuku Gasa, serving as scouts for the Allies. He etched a message—”NAURO ISL/NATIVE KNOWS POSIT/HE CAN PILOT/11 ALIVE/NEED SMALL BOAT/KENNEDY”— onto the husk of a coconut and asked the two scouts to deliver it to the nearest allied base. Kumana and Gasa’s successful mission led to the eventual rescue of Kennedy and his crew on August 8, 1943. 

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Seen above, the coconut with John F. Kennedy’s inscription was turned into a paperweight, which the President kept on his desk in the Oval Office.

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Sixty-five years later, speaking with an American visitor to the Solomon Islands,  Eroni Kumana requested that a highly prized family heirloom—a piece of “Shell Money” or “Kustom Money”—be  placed at the gravesite of his “Chief,” President Kennedy, as a formal tribute. Made by hand out of giant clam shells, “Kustom Money” was used for many purposes, including for honoring one’s chief.

On November 1, 2008, at a ceremony held at Arlington National Cemetery, members of President Kennedy’s family gathered to receive Kumana’s tribute which was placed on the grave.

 After remaining on the gravesite, the “kustom money” was conveyed to the Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum where it will now be displayed as part of the museum’s permanent exhibits next to the coconut shell that led to the rescue of JFK and his crew.

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We appreciate his dedication to his craft.

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by Stacey Chandler, JFK Library Reference Archivist

The Civil Rights Act of 1964, signed by President Lyndon Johnson on July 2, 1964, was a long time in the making.

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(Pictured: JFK’s televised address to Americans on civil rights, June 11 1963)

By spring 1963, JFK had dealt with civil rights abuses using tactics ranging from phone calls to executive orders – even asking Congress to act in February (they didn’t). But on June 11, when a public showdown with Governor George Wallace led JFK to take control of the Alabama National Guard and force the integration of the University of Alabama, JFK decided to talk directly to Americans about doing more for civil rights.

In a speech that night, JFK laid out a moral case for new civil rights laws, promising to bring a bill to Congress that would “move this problem from the streets to the courts.” On June 19 the administration delivered, in the form of H.R. 7152 (below).

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(See more pages from HR 7152 here: http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKPOF-053-004.aspx)

The original bill did seven things:

  • enforced federal voting rights;
  • desegregated “public accommodations” like hotels and diners;
  • let the Attorney General help desegregate public schools;
  • formed a national service to solve local problems;
  • extended the Commission on Civil Rights;
  • banned discrimination in federally-funded programs;
  • and made the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission permanent.

Arguments about government overreach instantly hit the news and the White House mail room: did the federal government have the right to tell businesses what to do?

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(A pamphlet warns “personal liberty will be chained by the over-riding power of the Federal government.”
See more: 
http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/BMPP-028-003.aspx)

RFK went to Congress to argue that the 14th Amendment and commerce clause did allow federal intervention in private businesses (JFK was busy that day, declaring “Ich bin ein Berliner” to a cheering crowd in Germany). Unconvinced, Governor Wallace later called the rules a “socialistic scheme of government which will bring the total destruction of private property rights.”

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(Pictured, an excerpt from RFK’s testimony before the House Judiciary Committee, June 26 1963. http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKWHSFLCW-022-004.aspx)

Meanwhile, police set dogs and fire hoses on protestors, a bomb killed four little girls in a Birmingham church, and voters were turned away by impossible literacy tests. Civil rights supporters were worried the bill couldn’t fix all of these problems, and pushed for stronger laws.  

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[JFKWHCSF-0482-001-p0144. Telegram from K. Patrick Okura, urging “meaningful civil rights legislation.”]

JFK’s staff answered mail from around the country, many pushing for stronger civil rights laws. Their response? A tougher bill wouldn’t pass, and that couldn’t be risked.

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 [JFKWHCSF-0482-001-p0116. An excerpt of Lee White’s response to a civil rights advocate pushing for tough laws.]

Shepherded by Republican William McCullough and Democrat Emmanuel Celler, an edited H.R. 7152 finally made it through the House Judiciary Committee on October 29, 1963 – the first hurdle on a long track. Just three weeks later, JFK was assassinated in Dallas, the last lines of his final speech forever unspoken:

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[Speech cards from the last speech written for JFK. http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKPOF-048-023.aspx ]

LBJ, working to push the bill through the House and Senate, said a few days later: “No memorial oration or eulogy could more eloquently honor President Kennedy’s memory than the earliest possible passage of the civil rights bill for which he fought so long.”

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[ST-C277-1-63.- President John F. Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson Meet with Organizers of “March on Washington,” August 28 1963.]

After more editing, arguing, and political gaming worthy of its own TV series (including an infamous filibuster and a surprise addition on women’s rights), the final version of H.R. 7152 was signed into law by LBJ on July 2, 1964, marking what the Senate Historical Office calls “one of the most significant legislative achievements in American history.”

A big thanks to JFK Library archivist Stacey Chandler for this guest blog. Follow us for more from Stacey!

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One more sneak peek of our new exhibit, “Presidential Getaway: JFK and Cape Cod.” Pictured, a golf club and special presidential golf balls used by #JFK.